Unpopular Opinion: The 4440 isn’t perfect…

Sieren 4450 MFWD
This John Deere 4450 MFWD is an absolute cream puff with only 5925 original one-owner hours! Click the pic to see the details and lots more photos!

The John Deere 4450 was quite a tractor.

Actually, you could probably say the same thing about the entire 50-series lineup.

Mother Deere’s 50-series lineup was the biggest product line of new tractors in the company’s history. Between 1981-1986, the company launched 22 new tractors. I believe 19 of ’em were available in the States, and 3 were local to Argentina. I think that’s pretty impressive, given that the Farm Crisis was happening at the same time!

At any rate, the 4450 was definitely the bread-and-butter model. It took everything that the American farmer loved about the 4430/4440 models and improved them.

(This is the point where the 4440 guys start lighting the torches and sharpening the pitchforks…)

Wait, what? The 4440 was the perfect tractor! There was nothing better! You’re an idiot, Interesting Iron guy!

4440s Arent Perfect

I said what I said. ?

Here’s why I think they’re a better tractor from a mechanical perspective.

      1. MFWD.
      2. 15-speed Powershift.
      3. Castor Action.

Prior to 1983, most (if not all) of Deere’s rowcrop 4WD systems were run off of the hydraulic pump, and they really weren’t all that great. They were notoriously unreliable, didn’t like to work when it was cold, and they were spendy to maintain. With the introduction of the 50-series tractors, the company implemented a mechanical system that used gears and a driveshaft. It was a lot more reliable, less expensive to maintain, and unlike the hydraulic system, built to work all the time if needed.

The 15-speed Powershift was, in most cases, better for field work. It gave the operator more gearing options to more effectively use the engine’s power (i.e., less “in between” issues than an 8-speed). Furthermore, because the gearing wasn’t spaced so far apart, shifts were a little less clunky. (Come on 30/40-series guys, you gotta admit that they shift pretty hard…)

Lastly, Castor Action. Castor Action was a system that tilted the kingpin on the front axle 13° so you could turn sharper. No more taking three acres to get the tractor turned around. It was faster and more efficient because it used less fuel. It wasn’t perfect, but it definitely saved farmers time and money.

Anyway, I’m sure the 4440 crowd would argue with me until the cows come home, but in my opinion, the 4450 was the better machine. The 4440 was definitely more iconic, but it did have its shortcomings.

Farmers seemed to think so, too. While the older tractors may have moved more units, the 4450 still accounted for 1 out of every 5 tractors sold in the 50-series lineup. Hard to argue with sales numbers like that!

Sieren4450MFWD2

So, why did I choose this one for this week’s Interesting Iron? Because it’s probably one of the nicest 4450s you can buy on the market right now. I talked with Riley Sieren, the auctioneer who’s hosting this estate auction, about this tractor earlier this week. He told me that Marvin, the man who owned this tractor, was the only owner. He bought it new from R.J. Schott’s John Deere dealership in Sigourney, IA in 1986. Since then, he only put 5925 hours on it. He also told me that Marvin took a lot of pride in his equipment; he always kept it in the shed, and he was quite particular about keeping his tractors spotless inside and out.

If ever there was a cream puff, this is it. Go check out the listing. There’s a ton of great photos and Riley took the time to capture the details. I’m pretty confident in saying that this is one of the cleanest all-original John Deere 4450 MFWDs on auction that I’ve seen all year long.

Honestly, I could see this tractor hitting $45-50K before the hammer drops on December 3. I looked at some of the trends using our Iron Comps data to see what these were doing and boy, these 50-series tractors are continuing to climb in value. They’re tough tractors that are really handy on a farm of nearly any size. They’ll do nearly all the tasks that a big tractor will do, while still being handy enough to maneuver around in tight spaces. Furthermore, you can still work on ’em!

Side note: There’s a ton of great equipment on this sale. Lots of good, one-owner, well-maintained green stuff. Check out the full sale bill here.

Final Hammer Price: $55400

How the Case IH Magnum built a bridge…

Magnum 7130
Bidding wraps up on this one-owner, 7200 hour Case IH Magnum 7130 on August 6, 2020. Click the photo to see the details on this beauty!

I’ve written about the Case IH Magnum plenty of times before, and I’ll probably do it again, because there are a lot different angles to the Magnum story. It wasn’t that they were just great tractors; for many farmers, they still set the standard!

The process of merging J.I. Case and IH wasn’t exactly easy. With overlapping equipment lines, models on both sides were scrapped. It was a business move, but inevitably, feelings got hurt. Whether perceived or real, there was definitely a wedge between Case and IH employees (dealers too).

Everybody in the new company knew their future depended two things. America had to survive the farm crisis, and the Magnum had to be a big hit. The employees knew they had a really solid product; still, if either of those two things didn’t happen, those employees were going to be looking for new jobs in a time when new jobs weren’t real easy to get. When you’re fighting for your job, you tend to band together and bust it a lot harder.

The Magnum became the bridge-builder and put the “us” and “them” mentality to bed for Case and IH. They banded together because they had to, and built a tractor that America still relies on to this day. Hard to argue with that kind of determination, isn’t it?

This Magnum 7130 MFWD is a super-clean one-owner tractor with just under 7200 hours on the meter. It lives in Montana right now, and our friends at Pifer’s Auction & Realty are sending it home to a new owner on Thursday, August 6! Click the photo to go to the listing!

Browse Case IH Magnum tractors going to auction near you!
Fun Fact – The first Magnum off the line was a 7140 MFWD. Case IH worked it so hard that it was eventually scrapped. The 2nd one off the line? It was a 7130, and it still exists today!