The Coolest Tractor Auctions of 2020 – Pt. 2

There are a lot of cool tractor auctions that I never got to write about for Interesting Iron this year. We see lots of neat tractors and trucks listed on Tractor Zoom by our auction partners. Unfortunately, I can’t write about ’em all.

Still, they deserve a little time in the spotlight, so let’s do a year-end wrap-up of 20 of the coolest tractors, trucks, and pickups that didn’t make it to Interesting Iron in 2020! Last week, we covered everything from record-setting red tractors to Big Buds to Cummins-swapped squarebodies. This week, let’s look at the rest of the list!

Wagner TR14A

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Wagner was one of the very early pioneers in the BIG tractor movement.

The Wagner Tractor story has a bunch of different angles – way more than I can cram into a paragraph or two, but suffice it to say that they were a pioneer in the 4WD tractor movement. They built great big beasts in an era where lots of companies couldn’t even imagine a farmer big enough to need a tractor like that!

This big TR14A was one of two Wagners on a Sullivan sale in northeast Iowa this past August. Neither one of them brought a lot of money, but they still deserve a spot in the history books. Wagner tractors are an integral part of the big power farming story. I don’t think they’ll ever see the collectability that their green stepbrothers have (Wagner built big tractors for John Deere for a little while – I told you there were a lot of angles to this story!), but they’re cool in my book!

Side note: For you big tractor collector types, the silver lining to the low-price cloud is that if you want to start a niche-y collection, they don’t typically sell for huge dollars when they do come up! (Sadly, you don’t see many Wagners at tractor auctions…once in a while, maybe, but not often.)

Auctioneer: Sullivan Auctioneers
Sale Date: 8.12.20
Hammer Price: $5,500

Lowest-houred 1066 on the planet?

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If there’s a verified lower-houred 1066 on the planet, we haven’t heard of it yet…

Usually if there’s a super-low-houred classic that’s coming up for auction, word gets around. Not this time. This 2-owner black stripe 1066 only had 794 original (and verified) hours on it! I’ve never seen a lower-houred 1066 in my entire life! Needless to say, this beautiful survivor brought big money. It smashed the previous record by $19K, hammering home for $46K after it was all said and done!

People have wondered if maybe the market is starting to slip on 1066s a little bit. I think this one, even though it’s a bit of an outlier example, still reinforces the case that there’s still demand for classics like this – both for collectors as well as for farm use!

Oddly enough, though…this wasn’t the highest-priced 1066 we’d see in 2020. More on that in a minute.

Auctioneer: Creamer, Heimes & Janssen Auctioneers
Sale Date: 8.14.20
Hammer Price: $46,000

The Florida 1206

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1206s like this one are the tractors that teenage farmboys dream of. Heck, who am I kidding? I still dream of ’em too and I haven’t been a teenager in a LONG time!

This is probably one of my favorite tractors that rolled across the block this year (maybe a tie between this one and Jerry’s 1256 Wheatland). I’m sure there are purists that are cringing over this pick because they think a “true” Wheatland couldn’t be ordered with fat tires like this, and they think it looks way too hot-rodded. To each their own. I’ve seen some of the ordering paperwork and I’m pretty certain you could order these with factory 24.5s like this one.

Anyway, this one presented very nicely in my opinion. In addition, this is the very last IH 1206 built in 1966! The bidders didn’t go as nuts over this one as I thought they might, but Deanco still got a pretty reasonable price out of it.

I think what I really like about this one is that it shows that you can still find a decent deal on a collector tractor at an auction. They don’t ALWAYS go for a small fortune. I don’t know who ended up with this one, but I hope it was a young collector, and it’s a cornerstone of their collection!

Auctioneer: Deanco Auction
Sale Date: 8.26.20
Hammer Price: $15,500

The Traction King

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The Case 1200 Traction King is a pretty unique animal with a face that only a mother could love…

When Case got into the 4WD tractor market in 1963 with the 1200 Traction King, they did it in the typical Case way. They’d always produced a quality product with reasonable features at an affordable price. They drew a box around what they wanted, and they built a tractor that fit within those parameters. In this case, that meant using pieces and parts that were already sitting on the shelf to keep costs down. Had they wanted to, they could’ve built something super-robust that made a ton of power, but that would’ve been overkill. They had the components to build a 200-horse tractor that probably would’ve tipped the scales at 20,000 lbs., but that would’ve been more than what was necessary for the time.

The 1200 Traction King was, at the time, a great tractor with one rather glaring flaw…the turbocharger. A normal 451 cubic inch Lanova that Case put in this tractor normally made 105 horsepower, but that would’ve been just a little underpowered for this big tractor. The tractor needed more power, and the only way to get it was to turbocharge it. Unfortunately, though, the turbo’d 451 was a fragile motor with a tendency to run REALLY hot.

The 1200 didn’t sell tremendously well, and Case only turned out about 1500 of them. This one was nicely restored, and like the 1206 from the same auction, the bidders didn’t go crazy with it. Somebody got a pretty good deal on this piece of history and took it home for $10K!

Auctioneer: Deanco Auction
Sale Date: 8.26.20
Hammer Price: $10,000

Number One

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There’s only one “first one”…and this is it.

Just like they say that they’re only original once…there’s only one “first one.” This is the very first 1066. Serial number 7101. Amazingly enough, this tractor lived in Iowa all of its life. It was originally sold on December 8, 1971 by Falb Implement in Elgin, IA and only changed hands twice since then. Sometime in 1976, it was sold by Rhomberg Implement in Elkader, IA to Ray Cassutt who farmed with it until November 6, 1987, when Jerry Everitt bought it at Ray’s retirement auction.

1066 #1 is an incredibly original tractor. What you see in the photo is essentially what it looked like in December 1971 when it originally sold in Elgin! I believe the only things that aren’t factory original are the tires. Otherwise, that’s the original paint and Hiniker cab! Here’s the real crazy part…even after three owners, it’s only got 2993 original hours on it!

There was a LOT of discussion about who would end up with it and how much they’d end up paying for it. Heck, we had even had a pool going with in our office on what it would bring! (And had we not been playing Price Is Right rules, I’d have won the darn thing…)

When the hammer finally fell, the winning bidder paid $86,100. Honestly, it was less than a lot of people thought it was going to sell for (I heard guesses of anything from $50K to a quarter million). There were a fair number of people who were pretty annoyed that Case IH wasn’t the buyer. That’s okay, though. I’m sure Case IH knows where it went… (I can also tell you that they’ll probably have to pay through the nose if they want to get their hands on it.)

Auctioneer: Joel’s Tractors/Aumann Auction
Sale Date: 9.22.20
Hammer Price: $86,100

Ain’t no feelin’ like Petermobilin’!

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Long-nosed 379s are some of the most beautiful trucks on the road, in my opinion. This one ticks off almost all the right boxes for me.

If ever there was an iconic semi, the long-nosed 379 is it. They’re the most popular owner-operator semi in history, and it’s not at all uncommon to see them customized like this one. I’m telling you…if I were ever to own a semi, this is what it would look like. (I might stretch the frame a little wee bit further and it would likely have a fire-breathing 6NZ Cat under the hood.)

I had a few buddies who had their eye on this truck when it went up for auction, but none of them ended up picking it up. Truthfully, I only saw one thing that likely kept the price from six figures. Most buyers looking for a semi like this are expecting to see some sort of Caterpillar under the hood (a 6NZ or a C15 most likely), and this one had a 60-series Detroit in it. Still, it hammered home for a very nice price and the seller was happy with the outcome.

Auctioneer: Hamilton Auction
Sale Date: 10.1.20
Hammer Price: $84,500

Haaaaay Oliver!

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This is a pretty rare old Oliver. One of only 93 built!

In the world of Olivers, finding a 2050 is a pretty remarkable thing. They only built a total of 383 of them – including Cockshutt variants. But to find a front wheel assisted model? That’s exceedingly rare. There were only 93 FWA variants produced in total!

As you can see, this one wasn’t in perfect shape, but it was all there for the most part. I don’t know where it ended up, but I’d be shocked if it wasn’t a collector that picked it up.

Rare classics are out there, kids. You just need to keep an eye open for them! They do show up at regular old tractor auctions once in a while!

Auctioneer: Wieman Land & Auction
Sale Date: 10.7.20
Hammer Price: $13,500

Pro Tip: Smart auction buyers (and collectors) don’t waste hundreds of hours scrolling through endless auction listings for the equipment they’re looking for. They use Tractor Zoom’s custom search alerts and let our system do the looking! Set up a free TZ user account here, and then set up an alert to get a text or email whenever we get a match for whatever you’re looking for! With over 450 auctioneer partners, we’ll end up finding it faster! (And if you need to find out what equipment is worth, you need to take a look at Iron Comps!)

The Mediapolis Fire Truck

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Hard to beat a classic…even harder to beat it when it’s a beefed-up fire truck!

There’s been a resurgence in popularity of 70s and 80s pickups over the past few years. They’re tough trucks that are easy to work on or restore, and they’re darn good lookin’ things! For a lot of today’s gearheads, trucks like this remind them of learning to wrench with Dad or Grandpa in the garage. In that sense, they become more than just a hunk of iron. They’re sentimental.

At any rate, this 1979 F-350 served in the Mediapolis Fire Dept. from when it was new until the fall of 2013 when it was retired. Since then, it’s been stripped of the gear in the back (a water pump, tank, and hose reel), and generally freshened up a bit. Nothing crazy. It doesn’t need it! At the end of the day, it has 30K original miles and a 400 in it – the biggest motor you could have gotten it with! (And before you start the “You’re wrong, Interesting Iron Guy” emails…you couldn’t get a 460 in a 4×4 in 1979. I checked.)

Bidders LOVED this truck, and it was one of the hottest sellers on this sale. When the hammer fell, it brought nearly $24K!

Auctioneer: Sullivan Auctioneers
Sale Date: 10.26.20
Hammer Price: $23,750

A tough one to part with…

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Letting go of this one was probably one of the toughest things the seller ever had to do…

A long time ago, I remember writing something about how, at the end of the day, these aren’t just machines. Whether it’s a truck, a tractor, a combine, or something else that can be driven, pivotal moments of life have been spent there. How many grandfathers planted corn after dinner with one of their grandsons riding on the armrest of a 1086? How many times has a father consoled a heartbroken teenaged daughter sitting in the buddy seat of a 9770 STS during harvest? Furthermore, how many teenage boys have saved every penny so they could put a lift kit on an old Chevy like this one? My point is that these things aren’t just tools that we’re talking about.

Life happens in these vehicles.

Nothing that crossed the auction block in 2020 drove that point home harder for me than this truck.

See, this truck belonged to a kid named Seth from Louisiana. It was his pride and joy. He drove it everywhere and I’m sure he had a lot of fun in that truck. I’m sure he drove that truck to his high school graduation ceremony, and maybe out to a party afterwards. Might’ve taken it out on a first date or two as well.

Then, on his first day of college, doctors discovered that he had bone cancer. Three years and a long, hard fight later, Seth passed away in 2013 at age 21.

Seth’s grandfather held on to the truck for the past seven years. I can’t even begin to imagine how hard it must have been for him to sit in that old Chevy and think about his grandson. My heart goes out to him, and his family. Nobody ever thinks that they’ll have to bury their grandchild. Still, it happens.

A month or two ago, Seth’s grandfather decided that it was time that the truck went to start a new life with a new owner, so he consigned it with our friends at Henderson Auctions in Livingston, LA. When the auction ended, the proceeds (including buyer’s premium) went to the family’s church to help build a memorial pavilion in Seth’s memory. It sold for $12,000.

Friends, we’re not promised tomorrow. Don’t wait to make memories with your family and friends.

Auctioneer: Henderson Auctions
Sale Date: 12.12.20
Hammer Price: $12,000

The Allis Chalmers that couldn’t swim…

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Every tractor has a story. This one is pretty darn funny.

So earlier this summer, there was another AC 8550 that sold at an Indiana retirement auction and smashed the existing record. I think 8550s are really cool and I wrote about that one for Interesting Iron. Super Beasts don’t show up at tractor auctions very often; to see two of them sell in a calendar year is somewhat uncommon. In the end of that article in above, though, I told the story of another Super Beast that lived at Loretta Lynn’s ranch in the late 70s into the 80s.

THIS IS THAT VERY TRACTOR THAT I TOLD THE STORY ABOUT!!!

See, back in the day, AC had a strong marketing partnership with Loretta Lynn. They had a working hobby-type ranch in Tennessee, and farmed with orange tractors. Early one Sunday morning, one of the local dealers got a frantic call from Loretta’s husband Mooney. Apparently he’d learned that Super Beasts can’t swim. I believe the story goes that there’d been a little Saturday night drinking involved, and he’d driven it into a pond and cooked the motor in the process.

After a bit of “discussion” between the involved parties, Allis replaced the motor in that tractor, and up until just a few weeks ago, it was still working on a farm in Ohio!

Now, this tractor didn’t set a crazy record when our friends at Harmeyer Auction sold it, but $24,000 is still pretty strong money. That Allis landed in a collection up in North Dakota a week or two. Not only did they get the tractor, but they got a heck of a story to go with it!

Auctioneer: Harmeyer Auction & Appraisal
Sale Date: 12.12.20
Hammer Price: $24,000

So there you have it, my friends. The 20 most interesting things that I didn’t have the chance to write about for Interesting Iron in 2020. Hope you enjoyed the stories! I’m going to be hard at work finding new stories to tell in 2021, and I hope to run into you at tractor auctions down the road!

Big Blue: The Ford 9600

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Big power from small cubes! This beautiful Ford 9600 sells on August 24, 2020. Click the photo to learn more about this one-owner gem!

The 9600 is probably my favorite Ford tractor of all time. There’s something about these things that just looks right. A 9600 open station with a narrow front on a set of 20.8 Firestone Deep Treads, the white fenders with the lights in ’em, and a ROPS bar? That just screams muscle tractor to me.

The 9600 was the top dog in Ford’s lineup in 1975. It made just over 135 PTO horse from a turbocharged 401, which was one of the smallest motors of the era (I think the only one to make similar horsepower with a smaller motor was Massey Ferguson). This particular tractor also features Dual-Power, Ford’s version of a torque amplifier, which effectively allowed the operator to split the dual-range 4-speed into a 16-speed transmission. This one works, too!

The 9600 had a reputation for being a really torque-y tractor with lots of low-end grunt. It’s also known to be pretty fuel-efficient, too. I know a guy from Missouri who still farms with one today; even though he’s turned it up a little, he swears it only burns about 6.5 gallons/hour!

This particular 9600 is in BEAUTIFUL shape! It’s a one-owner tractor with good rubber all the way around, straight tin, and it’s absurdly clean both inside and out! Here’s the best part, though…it’s only got 3033 hours on it! It’s barely broken in! It lives in Minnesota until next week when our friends at Zielsdorf Auction & Real Estate send it home with a new owner!

If you want to see some video of a nicely-restored Ford 9600, our friends at Successful Farming interviewed a farmer in Grinnell, IA not too long ago for their Ageless Iron segment. Watch it here!

Useless Trivia:

How do you tell the difference between an 8000-series and a 9000-series Ford without looking under the hood? Look at the grill. On the 8000-series tractors, the rectangles are vertical. On the 9000-series, they’re horizontal!

The Greatest Farm Show You’ve Never Heard Of: Blackmore Corner

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Two beautiful two-cylinder Deeres gracing the front lawn of the Blackmore Corner Antique Farm Show!

Nothing to see from an auction perspective. Not this time.

This post is all about a road trip to the best heritage farm show you’ve never heard of. It’s a little off the beaten path just south of Ellston, IA, and it’s awesome!

Now in its 10th year, the Blackmore Corner Antique Farm Show is the brainchild of the Dolecheck family. It started as a way to play with old iron that they (and their neighbors) had used over the years. Since then, it’s grown quite a bit, with a lot of iron being trailered in from the surrounding area! The day before the show, they host a 70-80 mile tractor ride and a big cookout, too, so it’s a full weekend!

The afternoon that I was there, they were threshing wheat with an old belt-driven thresher (running off of an old F-20, no less). In another area, there were six or eight plows hard at work turning the dirt! The plan was to pick corn the following day using a variety of pickers and some old combines, but intermittent rain hampered their plans.

The Blackmore Corner Antique Farm Show ended the Saturday night festivities with an old-style tractor pull. Lots of kiddos sitting on hay bales, lawn chairs in the bed of old Chevys, that sort of thing. I love pulls like that!

The Dolechecks don’t do a lot of marketing for this show, but they do have a Facebook page with more information and some cool drone footage from years past! I would expect that this show grows quite a bit over the next few years, so if you’re able to come out, I’m sure they’d love to have you!

Here’s what I saw while I was there.

American flag waving near farm equipment at sunset
The American flag over amber waves of grain…
John Deere 830 Diesel
This 830 is weighted up to do some work. Don’t let that paint job fool you!
Two John Deere Tractors
There’s the 830 Diesel again, this time with its stablemate, a 730 Diesel. Both beautifully restored.
John Deere 720 Diesel
Here’s a better shot of the 730 Diesel.
A line of John Deere tractors
From left to right: 4255 hot farm pulling tractor, 7520, a 4620 (I think?), and a pair of 4320s. There’s an 1155 Massey that photobombed the picture, too.
Minneapolis Moline tractors
It wasn’t just red and green. Here’s a pair of all-original Minneapolis Moline G1000s (one is a Wheatland, the other is a row crop).
Ford 5000
That sunbrella on this Ford 5000 came in awfully handy. It was sunny and HOT!
Farmall 1206 at sunset
Iowa’s sunset game is STRONG. The Farmall 1206 is the icing on the cake!
Trio of Farmalls
A trio of Farmalls.
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All lined up in a row! Ronnie Shields has a terrific Farmall collection and he had most of it on display!
Farmall M with a hay rake.
Farmall M on a hay rake. Case threshing machine in the background.
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Hay bales, a few coolers, Old Glory waving in the breeze, tractors, and a pulling track. No better recipe for a terrific Saturday night!
5 Millionth IH 1066 (replica)
A good lookin’ 5 Millionth clone!
1066 narrow front
This 1066 Narrow Front is still fully operational as a farm tractor. In fact, it’s been known to hook to the pulling sled while still wearing a corn picker!
John Deere 4440 pulling tractor
Another one from the Dolecheck stables, this 4440 has the narrow front from a 4040, and is also fully operational. It’ll also hook to the sled while wearing a picker!

Later in the evening, the plow demonstrations gave way to a tractor pull, and these next photos are from that portion of the day. Although some are still working tractors, those with roll cages definitely aren’t!

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Timing. Is. Everything. I do love taking photos at sunset.

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So there you have it, the gallery from the Blackmore Corner Antique Farm Show 2020!

If you’re looking for a classic of your own, you should browse tractors coming up at an auction near you! There’s lots of good stuff trading hands these days!

The Roadless 95

The Roadless 95: Ford 5000 MFWD
This rare little Ford 5000 conversion packs a lot of MFWD power for its size! It’s selling at an auction in NY on July 10, 2020! Click the photo to see the listing and more photos!

It seems like there are more unique and interesting Ford conversions out there than with any other tractor brand. Most of them never made it over to American soil, though, which makes this one, a Roadless 95, all the more interesting! Goodrich Auction Service in Newark Valley, NY, sends this fairly rare tractor home to a new owner on Friday, July 10. I’m really interested to see what it this odd little tractor sells for!

The Roadless 95 started as a Ford 5000; however, before selling it, the Roadless Traction Company made some “minor” modifications to it. The British company stretched the frame about 6″ so they could stuff a 95-horse 6-cylinder Ford diesel motor into it. Roadless also turned it into a 4WD using a transfer case (built in-house) and the axle from a military 6×6. They’re pretty beefy!

I think this is a 1966-68 model. If it is, that make this one VERY rare. Roadless only made 210-215 of these, and I don’t think many of them made it over here. They’re still quite popular with English and Dutch tractor collectors as I understand it.

Admittedly, this one is rough. At some point in its life, an aftermarket turbo kit has been added to it (possibly an M&W?), so this tractor definitely makes more power than your average Roadless 95. Evan Goodrich, the auctioneer, says that it runs well and that the 4WD works too. This would be a fun one to bring to a plow day!

I have no idea what this tractor is worth, but to the right collector, it might be just what they’re looking for! I’d imagine that if a collector does pick it up, that turbo might be the first thing to go in the restoration process.

If you’re that buyer, I’d love to hear from you! Shoot me an email!