The Hillside Hero: Case 2670

Case 2670
This Case 2670 Traction King lives in Missouri for now…will you be the one to bring it home? Click the photo for the details and a link to bid!

This one is for my buddy Nellson. He likes Case’s crab-walking tractors because they had the oomph for heavy tillage, but didn’t sacrifice the maneuverability of a smaller tractor. He also thinks the 2670 stretched the 504 a little too far even with the intercooler, but that’s a discussion for another beer. ?

In the mid-70s, J.I. Case was a pretty well-established player in the game with their rigid-frame 4WD tractors. Farmers loved the 2470 for its ability to handle like a 2WD but with the grunt to run heavy implements…but they needed more capability. Farming was growing at unprecedented levels, and farmers were planting more ground than ever before.

So…Case turned up the wick on the 2470, and brought out the 2670. It was everything that the 2470 was, but with about 50 extra horse. It took a lot more than simply turning the pump screw to get there, though. To make all that extra power, it took a different injector design, a bigger pump, and an intercooler!

By far, though, the thing that made the big Traction King popular was its ingenious method of steering. If you’ve never seen a Case 4-wheel-steer tractor make a wicked tight turn before, it’s a thing of beauty, let me tell you! You can turn one of these tractors around in under 16 feet! Furthermore, on steep hills (think wheat fields in Eastern WA), the crab-steer function almost eliminated implement side draft!

This particular 2670 Traction King lives about 45 minutes north of Sedalia, MO until the end of August. It’s got just under 8000 hours on it, and it’s in surprisingly good shape for its age. It’s not a museum piece per se – the new owner is going to need to address some hydraulic issues. Still, the tin work is fairly clean, it’s got reasonably good rubber, and it’s in good running condition as far as I can tell!

The Mystery Moline: The G1000 Wheatland “Rice Special” FWA

Minneapolis Moline G1000 Wheatland "Rice Special" FWA
This Minneapolis Moline G1000 Wheatland “Rice Special” FWA sells on Saturday. One of two ever built! (Maybe?)

I’m just about positive that this is the single rarest tractor that an auctioneer has ever listed on Tractor Zoom. It’s one of two ever built…I think. For now, I’m still working on tracking that part down.

Background:

The Minneapolis Moline G1000 in and of itself isn’t the world’s most uncommon tractor (the factory churned out about 7400 of them), but there were a few of them that are super-rare. The G1000 Wheatland accounts for about 37% of the total production (just under 2900) according to some research done by the folks over at Michigan Moline.

The Rice Special:

The Minneapolis Moline G1000 Rice Special was a variant of the Wheatland, as best as I can tell, and I think most of them went down to TX near the Gulf Coast. Mechanically, they’re pretty much identical to the G1000 Wheatland. Same 504A-6 diesel motor, beefy frame, full crown fenders…the typical stuff. However, to be a Rice Special, it had to be ordered with rice tires (23.1-30s, I believe) and there may have been one or two other things. Regardless, they apparently have a special character or two somewhere on the serial tag (I don’t have a photo of the serial tag for this tractor, unfortunately.)

So here’s where the story gets interesting. There were only 89 4WD G1000 Wheatlands built, but I think there were only two  Rice Specials. I’ve done a fair amount of poking around and I only found record of one other one – it’s painted red and it’s got a cab on it.

The Mystery:

So, I’ll ask you…are these two tractors a pair separated at birth, or are they half-siblings? Was there another open-station G1000 Wheatland Rice Special with front wheel assist? Furthermore, if there was another, where is it now?

The world may never know. I’m trying to run down the gentleman in Texas who owns the other G1000 Rice Special. If the two of us get our heads together and figure this out, I’ll update this post!

In the meantime, go click the link and check out the details on this G1000! If you can help me solve the mystery, send me an email! (interestingiron@tractorzoom.com)

Until then, I’ll continue pacing the floor at night long trying to solve the mystery…

Looking for some Prairie Gold of your own? You should start here.

Super Beast Mode: The Allis Chalmers 8550

allis chalmers 8550 super beast
Big. Bad. Orange. This one-owner 8550 sells on Tuesday, August 4! Click the photo for the details on this monster!

Allis Chalmers was covering new ground during the 70s. The ground-breaking 7000 series was selling well, and they’d dipped their toes in the 4WD tractor market with the Steiger-built 440 earlier in the decade. Things were going well enough that in 1976, they unleashed “The Beast” – the 7580. It was AC’s first in-house 4WD tractor, and sported a bunch of nice improvements over the outgoing 440.

But…at 186 PTO horse, it was a little wussy for such a big tractor. Customers needed more.

In 1977, AC unleashed a badder animal…8550, known as The Super Beast. Where The Beast got its power from the 426, The Super Beast used one of the biggest motors Allis ever stuffed in a tractor. 731 ci of twin-turbo muscle, rated at 253 PTO horse! This tractor was literally so big that they had to disassemble part of it to get it into the Nebraska lab to test it!

This particular 8550 is a one-owner ’79 model with only 5342 hours, and it’s in GREAT shape for its age! Not only that, it still sees regular use on the farm! It lives in Indiana until Tuesday…then we’ll see where this big tractor ends up!

BTW: Funny story about another Super Beast…back in the day, AC had a strong marketing partnership with Loretta Lynn. They had a working hobby-type ranch in Tennessee, and farmed with orange tractors. Early one Sunday morning, one of the local dealers got a frantic call from Loretta’s husband Mooney. Apparently he’d learned that Super Beasts can’t swim. I believe the story goes that there’d been a little Saturday night drinking involved, and he’d driven it into a pond and cooked the motor in the process.

After a bit of “discussion” between the involved parties, Allis replaced the motor in that tractor, and it’s still working on a farm in Ohio today!

Super Beasts don’t come up for auction every day…but lots of other Allis Chalmers equipment does! Browse it all here!

The Corner-Carving Deere

John Deere 4455 Copy
This beautiful John Deere 4455 MFWD only has 2743 original hours on it, and it sells on July 13, 2020. Click the photo to see the listing and lots more photos of this beauty!

It’s getting hard to find a low-houred John Deere 4455 like this one these days; every now and then, however, one sneaks out of the barn and heads to auction. Like this one! This beautiful tractor only has 2743 original hours on it, and it sells at an auction hosted by Wears Auctioneering in Iowa City, IA. Sells with duals, full rack of front weights, new interior, and sales and service records.

The 4455 MFWD was a hot seller, because among other improvements, this tractor could turn sharper than the competition. Deere built a push-button system for the 50-series called Caster Action that tightened the turning radius. However, on the 55-series, it engaged automatically. By tilting the kingpin on the front axle a few degrees, the front wheels could lean over while turning; therefore tightening your turning radius. In fact, the stat nerds at Deere figured that if you dragged a 6-row 30″ cultivator through a square 100-acre field, you’d turn around 139 times! With Caster Action, the John Deere 4455 could cut about 18 feet off of each loop! When you do the math, that saves about a half mile per field! It doesn’t sound like much, but if you did the math all the way through the year, it’d add up to some decent fuel savings!

(That said…many owners turned their 4455s up a little, so the fuel savings went straight out the stack. Still, it was nice idea, right?)

This particular tractor is a 3-owner with 2743 hours (verified – service records and sale history comes with the tractor). The tractor has never left the state of Iowa all of its life, and each owner has maintained it very well. A Deere technician replaced the dash at 2727.9 hours in 2014; he engraved the original hours on the underside of the new dash to document the change. Since then, the owner has only it used a few hours per year mowing set-aside land. The new meter currently reads 14.9 hours.

Bidding on this one is pretty hot right now; I’ll be surprised if this tractor doesn’t hit close to $50K when the bidding is finished!

Final hammer price: $54,150.